Lenore Newman was born in Sechelt, a small town on the coast of British Columbia. As the child of a fishing family, Lenore received an early introduction to food production and direct sales aboard her family’s halibut boat, the Jaana. She grew up peddling fish on the dockside, eating in rough and tumble port town diners, and helping cook family recipes, all of which proved to be a gateway to a deep love of nature and a lifetime of thinking about food.

Lenore’s first book, Speaking in Cod Tongues: A Canadian Culinary Journey, was published by University of Regina Press in 2017. It has been reviewed in the National Post, the Toronto Star, and The Globe and Mail, and led to fifty print, radio, and television interviews, including on The Current, North by Northwest, CKNW, and Unreserved. Her second book, Lost Feast: Understanding Culinary Extinction, will be published in 2019 by ECW Press.

Lenore holds a Canada Research Chair in Food Security and Environment at the University of the Fraser Valley, where she is currently an Associate Professor of Geography and the Environment. Lenore’s academic career as a culinary geographer has included fieldwork around the globe in the study of public markets, regional cuisines, farmland preservation, global food security, and the ecology of the world’s food system.

Lenore’s work has received widespread attention, and in 2014 she was inducted into the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists. She has authored over forty academic papers and reports in her areas of research. Lenore is particularly proud of her work on foraged foods and on the impact of climate change on cuisine. She is is currently researching the role of immigration in shaping Canada’s agricultural sector.

She has published op-eds in Georgia Straight, the Vancouver Sun, The Globe and Mail, Alternatives Magazine, and Modern Agriculture Magazine, and she has been interviewed for a diverse and growing range of media outlets, including The Tyee, The Globe and Mail, the Vancouver Sun, The Province, The Bill Good Show, Vancouver Magazine, and Macleans. Topics include farmland protection, Canada’s cuisine, and the future of food. Most recently, Spotlight Productions interviewed Lenore for a TV documentary on the Nanaimo bar.

A popular speaker in British Columbia and beyond, Lenore has delivered keynotes and plenary lectures to the Ministry of Agriculture, the Vancouver Food Policy Council, and Canada’s Centre for Civic Governance. In 2014, Lenore was invited to Ottawa to give a Walrus Talk on Canada’s cuisine and climate change. She has spoken at dozens of conferences around the globe, including the Oxford Symposium of Food and Cookery, where she delivered a lecture on Canada’s emerging cuisines.

Lenore lives in Vancouver, Canada, with her partner and cat.

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Lenore Newman was born in Sechelt, a small town on the coast of British Columbia. As the child of a fishing family, Lenore received an early introduction to food production and direct sales aboard her family’s halibut boat, the Jaana. She grew up peddling fish on the dockside, eating in rough and tumble port town diners, and helping cook family recipes, all of which proved to be a gateway to a deep love of nature and a lifetime of thinking about food.

Lenore’s first book, Speaking in Cod Tongues: A Canadian Culinary Journey, was published by University of Regina Press in 2017. It has been reviewed in the National Post, the Toronto Star, and The Globe and Mail, and led to fifty print, radio, and television interviews, including on The Current, North by Northwest, CKNW, and Unreserved. Her second book, Lost Feast: Understanding Culinary Extinction, will be published in 2019 by ECW Press.

Lenore holds a Canada Research Chair in Food Security and Environment at the University of the Fraser Valley, where she is currently an Associate Professor of Geography and the Environment. Lenore’s academic career as a culinary geographer has included fieldwork around the globe in the study of public markets, regional cuisines, farmland preservation, global food security, and the ecology of the world’s food system.

Lenore’s work has received widespread attention, and in 2014 she was inducted into the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists. She has authored over forty academic papers and reports in her areas of research. Lenore is particularly proud of her work on foraged foods and on the impact of climate change on cuisine. She is is currently researching the role of immigration in shaping Canada’s agricultural sector.

She has published op-eds in Georgia Straight, the Vancouver Sun, The Globe and Mail, Alternatives Magazine, and Modern Agriculture Magazine, and she has been interviewed for a diverse and growing range of media outlets, including The Tyee, The Globe and Mail, the Vancouver Sun, The Province, The Bill Good Show, Vancouver Magazine, and Macleans. Topics include farmland protection, Canada’s cuisine, and the future of food. Most recently, Spotlight Productions interviewed Lenore for a TV documentary on the Nanaimo bar.

A popular speaker in British Columbia and beyond, Lenore has delivered keynotes and plenary lectures to the Ministry of Agriculture, the Vancouver Food Policy Council, and Canada’s Centre for Civic Governance. In 2014, Lenore was invited to Ottawa to give a Walrus Talk on Canada’s cuisine and climate change. She has spoken at dozens of conferences around the globe, including the Oxford Symposium of Food and Cookery, where she delivered a lecture on Canada’s emerging cuisines.

Lenore lives in Vancouver, Canada, with her partner and cat.

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